Ready for Ramadan 2019 : A Countdown and Review of Some Ramadan Books – III

Assalamu aleikum!

Check out three more books for #readyforramadan2019 below please.

 

In Ramadan Launch Poster

 

1. In Ramadan by Mariam Popal Hama

In Ramadan Front Cover

Summary: Contemplate the experiences and lessons in Ramadan through our animal friends. With 30 different aspects of Ramadan explored. Including the Arabic word for each.

Author & Illustrator: Mariam Popal Hama

Publisher: Prolance

Review: In Ramadan is a very artsy children’s book that will help children reflect on thirty basic elements of the nine month of the hijri calendar. Children will learn to link the holy month to the world around—animals and nature— them. The book also uses faceless animals and numbers to achieve this purpose. Finally,  In Ramadan will also increase the vocabulary of children and help them focus more on the light and souls of elements around of them.

sneak peak in ramadan

Thanks to Prolance for the free copy.

Rating: 4.5/5

Courtesy of the Dallas Public Library…

jinni night of moon

2. The Jinni on the Roof by Natasha Rafi

the jinni on the rooftop

Summary: Eight-year-old Raza is too young to fast, but he longs for the delicious parathas the grown-ups eat before dawn. The aroma of the flaky, golden bread tempts him. He cannot wait for the children’s breakfast, but he’ll get into trouble if anyone finds him up this early. Lying in bed, Raza hatches a plan. Will he get away with it? This is a delightful tale about a mischievous boy who learns the true meaning of Ramadan – patience and empathy.

Author: Natasha Rafi

Publisher: Pamir LLC

Review: The Jinni on the Roof is an hilarious story that portrays the level of genius of Raza, and his willingness to help his family during Ramadan. I definitely recommend it.

Rating: 4.5/5

3. Night of the Moon by Hena Khan

night of the moon

Summary: …this sweet tale follows Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, as she celebrates the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, “The Night of the Moon” (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illustrations that evoke Islamic art, this beautiful story offers a peek into modern Muslim culture—and into the ancient roots of its most cherished traditions.

Author: Hena Khan

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review: The illustrations are artsy and the story is evocative. Night of the Moon portrays the love relationship between a mother and her daughter during Ramadan. The reader will also learn to marvel at the beauties of the Creation.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

Thank you for reading,

~ A Ducktrinor Mom ~

Ready for Ramadan 2019 : A Countdown and Review of Some Ramadan Books – II

Assalamu aleikum!

ramadan moon lailahs lunch box

Welcome to another #readyforramadan2019 edition. Today, we have two books for you. Check them out!

Ramadan Moon

Summary: Ramadan, the month of fasting, doesn’t begin all at once. It begins with a whisper And a prayer And a wish. Muslims all over the world celebrate Ramadan and the joyful days of Eid-ul-Fitr at the end of the month of fasting as the most special time of year. This lyrical and inspiring picture book captures the wonder and joy of this great annual event, from the perspective of a child. Accompanied by Iranian inspired illustrations, the story follows the waxing of the moon from the first new crescent to full moon and waning until Eid is heralded by the first sighting of the second new moon. Written and illustrated by Muslims, this is a book for all children who celebrate Ramadan and those in the wider communities who want to understand why this is such a special experience for Muslims.

Author: Na’ima B. Robert

Publisher: Lincoln Children’s Books

Review: Ramadan Moon is beautifully illustrated. The quality of the book is also exceptional. It portrays Ramadan well for a Muslim family and depicts lots of love and gratitude all around. Alhamdullilah.

Rating: 5/5

lailas lunchbox

Summary: Lailah is in a new school in a new country, thousands of miles from her old home, and missing her old friends. When Ramadan begins, she is excited that she is finally old enough to participate in the fasting but worried that her classmates won’t understand why she doesn’t join them in the lunchroom. Lailah solves her problem with help from the school librarian and her teacher and in doing so learns that she can make new friends who respect her beliefs.

Author: Reem Faruqi

Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers

Review: Lailah’s Lunchbox explores the challenge of feeling like an outsider with wit. Lailah is lovable and finds comfort in writing to express herself. Today, many people are more aware of other people’s faiths. However, the book is still relevant because there will always be that one person who has no idea what Ramadan is. So this book can help explain. Alhamdullilah.

Rating: 5/5

 

Thank you for reading,

~ A Ducktrinor Mom ~

Ready for Ramadan 2019 : A Countdown and Review of Some Ramadan Books – I

ramadan 1440 or 2019

Besides my personal stack of Ramadan books for children, I was surprised to find over twenty books dealing with Ramadan at my local library. They were written by Muslims and non-Muslims. While I was happy about the mix of the sources, I was also sad by the lack of the mention of the honorific title ﷺ of the Beloved, the misrepresentation and false facts that seeped and got weaved in some of them. As Muslim parents, we have to make sure that we are aware of what is and what is not Ramadan and Islam. Below is part of my current stack. Alhamdullilah for a library.

ramadan books at fofkys

In this post, I will review some books and in the spirit of our countdown to the Sultan of the Months, I will review the others insha’Allah.

1. Ramadan (Celebrate the World) by Hannah Eliot

celebrate the world ramadan

Summary: In the ninth month of the year, when the first crescent moon rises in the sky, it’s time to celebrate Ramadan! In this lovely board book with illustrations from Rashin Kheiriyeh, readers learn that Ramadan is a time to reflect on ourselves, to be thankful, and a time to help others.

What I liked: The book is suitable for a toddler like mine. He was naturally drown to it. The illustrations are bright and colorful. The texts are short and great for his attention span. Finally, the chickens made him giggle alhamdullilah.

What I didn’t like: The characters closed their eyes during prayers. This is a practice that other people of the book did and do. Muslims were advised not to do this. I’m not sure if it was a challenge to draw characters with eyes cast down instead of completely shut. Allahu alim.

Rating: 4/5

2. Max celebrates Ramadan by Adria F. Worsham

max celebrates ramadan

Summary: Omar invites Max to his house for the end of Ramadan. Family, food, and fun are all part of the special day.

What I liked: The book reinforces the notion of giving, and the holy month is a lot about being charitable. It’s also an easy read to tackle with a toddler.

What I found strange: Moon and stars at the window during the Eid al-Fitr feast. Most Muslim families would agree that Believers rarely have a Ramadan dinner. Everybody is already full by then. The majority of the time, we are eager to eat at mid-day after thirty days of not doing so. I could be wrong.

Rating: 4/5

3. Ramadan by Sheila Anderson

ramadan sheila anderson

Summary: Introduces Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and prayer, and describes its history and the traditions and celebrations held for the holiday around the world.

What I liked: The book tries to answer basic questions about Ramadan succinctly. So, if you feel your child asks a lot of questions about Ramadan, this book can make your life easier.

What could have been worded better: “Muhammad is the founder of Islam. Muslims believe God told Muhammad how people should live their lives.” Everything about these two sentences is problematic to me. They were more Prophets sent with the message of Islam (Peace and Submission to The One True God) before Rasool sallallahu aleihi wassalam; the final and last Messenger. In addition, Islam is a way of life. It could have been worded this way in the second sentence.

Rating: 3/5

4. My First Ramadan by Karen Katz

my first ramadan

Summary: It’s time for Ramadan to begin. Follow along with one young boy as he observes the Muslim holy month with his family. This year, the narrator is finally old enough to fast, and readers of all ages will be interested as he shares his experiences of this special holiday in Islam.

What I liked: The book does a great job at showing the diversity of the adherents of Islam and encourages children to fast.

What I didn’t like: The characters also closed their eyes during prayers here too. It also felt like the protagonist’s family was missing their praying rugs, wore their shoes to pray and the little girl had no scarf on her head in the first pages of the book. She seemed old enough to don one in salaat.

Rating: 4/5

5. Rashad’s Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr by Lisa Bullard

rashads ramadan

Summary: For Muslims, Ramadan is a time for fasting, prayer, and thinking of others. Rashad tries to be good all month. When it’s time for Eid al-Fitr, he feasts and plays! Find out how people celebrate this special time of year.

Favorite part: “I’ve decided I’m going to watch the moon all year. I know it will grow bigger and smaller many times.” — Rashad

Rating: 4/5

If these books piqued your interest, add them to your collection of children books today by clicking on the hyperlinks. For more Ramadan reads, check here.

See you on March 4th and April 4th for more reviews of more books about Ramadan insha’Allah!

 

Thank you for reading,

~A Ducktrinor Mom~