Yaseen’s Big Dream — A Review

New Release! Book Launch and Blog Tour

Summary: Yaseen has got some big dreams. He dreams of helping his family, his friends, and his community. But is it really possible for a kid like Yaseen to do all of those things? Of course it is! Read Yaseen’s Big Dream to follow him on an adventure unlike any other.

 

Author: Umm Juwayriyah

Illustrator: Azra Momin

Formatted by: Reyhana Ismail

Publisher: Djarabi Kitabs Publishing

 

Review: The first thing that crossed my mind after I read the already illustrated and designed Yaseen’s Big Dream by Umm Juwayriyah was, “Yaseen’s Big Dream is a book that will inspire the Muslim Youth.” This is because Yaseen is an inspirational character who is loved, cherished and raised to believe that he can reach beyond the stars! He motivates and entertains the reader with his strong wills.

Additionally, he loves his family and they love him back, he stays busy with extra-curricular activities, he dreams big, has an intact fitra and much, much, much more. Not only will Yaseen inspire the readers, he will push for them to do more for their communities. Though the text is a bit complex for my son’s age, we read it several times. My toddler is at a point of time where he attempts to recap stories to me to show me his storytelling skills alhamdullilah. And that what’s he did with this book. He firmly declared that that he was a boy and that he was Yaseen. Masha’Allah alhamdullilah.

Umm Juwayriyah’s writing style usually respects the protagonist’s voice. Therefore, if the protagonist naturally and culturally speaks informally or formally, the dialogue and mind of the protagonist will show this. On the other hand, if the protagonist is too young to know sentences’ syntax or treat adults a certain way, she portrays this as well. I appreciate her efforts to make her characters real.

Above all, Yaseen’s Big Dream by Umm Juwayriyah is a definite recommended and empowering read for children around the world and especially in minority areas so that they may realize that when things look bleak for them, they have to BELIEVE that they can do anything they put their mind to. In other words, they can decide to be happy and make the change they (and we all) want to see!

 

Thank you for reading,

~ A Ducktrinor Mom ~

Childhood Champions (Book I & Book II) – A Review

Assalamu aleikum,

The projectno ordinary day

I received these two books depicted above by Muslim Author George Green, and I enjoyed reading them alhamdullilah. I can’t wait for my son to be able to read them for himself one day insha’Allah.

Title: No Ordinary Day

Series: Childhood Champions

Publisher: Echo Books

Author: George Green is a passionate author/ motivational speaker from New York City who inspires with words and his dedication to giving back to the community. He overcame his troubled childhood by leaving the city to attend college at Auburn University. With the love and encouragement of his family, George earned his Bachelor’s degree with a double major in English and Psychology. You can learn more at his website here.

Synopsis: Eight year old Ibrahim and friends win a Quran competition, where the prize sees them scoring tickets to watch an exciting football game after their class is paid a visit by Hakeem Mohammed, a star football player from the California Spartans.Hakeem Mohammed and the California Spartans are in New York City for one of the most anticipated football games of the season.  Ibrahim and friends unite with Hakeem in the locker room to meet the team before the big game. Though their meetings with Hakeem were brief, he instilled a life long impression before going on to star in one of the most memorable games in football. This story unfolds in No Ordinary Day, the first book from ‘Childhood Champions’, a new series of stories about a group of Muslim children in New York City and their daily adventures.

Thoughts: While there is a strong Islamic theme woven through this story, it didn’t turn me off. The execution was well done. I’m also happy to see that my son can read this in the future and say, ‘Look! There is an American Muslim authored book with my name in it!’ Masha’Allah well done.

Rating: 5/5

No Ordinary Day is available here on Amazon.

***

Title: The Project

Series: Childhood Champions

Publisher: Echo Books

Author: George Green

SynopsisThe Project is the story of Ibrahim and his friends, who are determined to work together as a team to win first prize at their school science fair. However, Yasin decides to make an effort to complete the project alone. This is a story of how much more can be achieved as part of a team than individually and the unexpected rewards that teamwork can deliver. This story unfolds in The Project, the second book from ‘Childhood Champions’, a series of stories about a group of Muslim children in New York City and their daily adventures.

Thoughts: I really like book 2 with the recurring characters of book 1. In this tome, Green makes it clear that it’s about teamwork. Consequently, these childhood champions get to find out that team work wins, always. The author did a good job catering to an often neglected market with buying power. In addition, it’s also about representation. Above all, I applaud the author for doing that most importantly.

Rating: 4/5

The Project is available on Amazon here.

 

Thank you for reading,

~A Ducktrinor Mom~

A Gift From Jannah – A Review

Launch Poster A Gift from Jannah

AuthorHira Khan is the creator and founder of BirthKeeper, providing Doula Services in the Toronto area and Prenatal Education to the global Muslim community since 2009.

Illustrator :  Jenny Reynish lives and works near Colchester in Essex, in the UK. She works as a freelance illustrator, having produced illustrations for various publishers of books and magazines in the UK and USA, as well as card designs.

PublisherProlance

Front Cover

Jannah Front Cover

Thoughts: A Gift From Jannah is a 34 page children’s book  with wonderful illustrations that helps satisfy the curiosity of children about their birth. It uses an easy to follow theist approach to explain the origin of babies without having to recourse to birds and bees talk yet. It’s ingenious and creative. I recommend it to parents who seek an easy answer to give to their younger children who have many questions. We can all agree that it’s really not easy sometimes to explain things to children they might not grasp at a young age.

Please get your copy on the author’s website here.

Rating: 4/5

~I received a free copy for the purpose of this review.~

Jazak’Allah khair for reading,

~A Ducktrinor Mom~

 

The One – A Children’s Book Review

the-one-2

Author:  Manaal Jafrey-Razaque

Illustrator : Tanya Emelyanova

Publisher : Prolance

What will it accomplish? Pious Muslim children who will exhibit taqwa insha’Allah

Summary: The One is a fun-to-read, rhyming storybook about Allah that touches upon fundamentals of His creation, proving Allah’s existence, and introducing some of His attributes for children to grasp from an early age in order to instill awe and love for Him, even though He cannot be seen.

Our Thoughts: The One is a 32 page children’s book in The Fundamental Series of Author Manaal Jafrey-Razaque. It’s definitely about fundamental education to inculcate to our Muslim children the presence of Allah even if they don’t see Him. The book strives to show children that the signs of the Creator are all around us and that is enough to take heed and believe in His ubiquitous presence.

The One will for sure help us raise young believers by teaching them 18 out of the 99 names of Allah. That said the book is not preachy at all. The drawings of everything Allah created are cute and inviting throughout the book. My son cooed with delight at the illustrations. It was precious masha’Allah.

Allah’s Attributes are used in English so they can appeal to non-Muslims who believe in The One as well. It’s at the end of The One that we get a summary of the 18 Attributes of Allah used through this rhyming read. And that’s a good way to start teaching children about Islam without overwhelming them. I recommend it to all Muslim parents.

There are also sprinkles of beautiful Quranic verses and one hadith on the rewards of learning all 99 names in The One.

Now, here is a sneak peek page of this wonderful children’s book:

sneak-peek-page

A few things on the Writer and Designer:

  • The Author Manaal.J.R is a Muslim-American born and raised in Southern California. She attended the University of Southern California for her Bachelor’s Degree.
  • The Illustrator Tanya.E is Russian and has a studio in Saint-Petersburg. Follow them on Facebook.

the-one-childrens-book

 

Finally, buy your copy here! I received a free copy 🙂 #alhamdullilah

Our Rating : 5/5

Thank you for reading,

~A Ducktrinor Mom~

Going to Hajj: A Book of Transport

 J ho
Author: Jameela Ho
Ilustrator: InikamiEDU
Format: Kindle eBook
Age: 1-4 years old
Available on Amazon here
Summary: Learn the different types of transportation with Fatimah and Hamzah as they find ways to go to the Ka’bah.
Our thoughts: Going to Hajj: A Book of Transport is a fun children’s book that satisfies children’s curiosity about means of transport, especially the ones that can be used to go to Hajj. By teaching them about transportation vehicles, we also get the chance to teach them about a major pillar of faith in Islam. It’s a must have. You can get more tips about teaching Hajj to children here on the author’s website with free coloring printables and activities.
~I received a free copy for my honest opinion~
Rating: 5/5
Thank you for reading,
A Ducktrinor Mom
P.S. Also in the series these below:
beginning to learn series

‘Islamic Fun Brain Busters for Kids’ by Fawziyyah F. Emiabata — Hayati Magazine

Title: Islamic Fun Brain Busters for Kids Author: Fawziyyah Folasade Emiabata of Muslim Teen Reads Ilustrator: Kaltrina Ferizi Editor: Lateefah Binuyo Format: Paperback Age: 7 years old + Description: An excellent fun way to challenge your brain with lots of fun Islamic themed puzzles even if you are an adult you can enjoy them… Our…

via ‘Islamic Fun Brain Busters for Kids’ by Fawziyyah F. Emiabata — Hayati Magazine

A Dress For Eid

 

A Dress For Eid Jameela Ho
Author: Jameela Ho
Ilustrator: InikamiEDU
Format: Kindle eBook
Age: 2-5 years old
Summary : Learn the colours with Ruqayya and Rabeah as they decorate a dress for Eid.
Our thoughts: Ruqayya and Rabbeah are two crafty little Muslimah who will help teach your children colors like white, pink, black, yellow, blue, red, orange, purple and green. They also work with shapes like stars, ribbons, circles and half circles, hearts, and flower symbols.
A dress for eid 1
You can download the following printables on the Author website for your young children.
Learning Colours Activity Book_Page_01 Free Printable Colour Book Download 2
My rating: 4.5/5
Thank you for reading,
~A Ducktrinor Mom~
*I received a free copy*

Little Muslimah – A Review

Little Muslimah is a 32 pages Children’s book by Umm Sumayyah and designed by Hillary Scott. It depicts the love between a mother and a daughter.

Little Muslimah

The illustrations are rich and colorful. The faces of the characters have wittingly been covered with objects surrounding them.

little M2

In this book, Little Muslimah asked her Mom why she is loved and her mother told her the reason as a bedtime story. I enjoyed the story as it makes us realize that we need to be grateful for our children too. Children rely on us, yes. But we need them too in order to have clarity of mind and stay happy.

Thank you for reading,

Papatya*

Fitra Journal: The Muslim Homeschool Quarterly: Getting Started Volume 1 Issue 1

FITRA 1

 

Fitra Journal: The Muslim Homeschool Quarterly: Getting Started

is a nice collection of testaments by Muslim Homeschoolers, a few of which are men masha’Allah. I loved this free treat because the contributors provide many resources and some of their opinions mirror my current state of mind. I’ll not impose anything on my son. I’ll continue to let him roam free and discover things on his own and intervene when he needs me. This was reinforced by the scripture which says that for the first seven years of a child’s life, play with the child. In the next seven years, teach them, and in the last seven years (by 21 years), be a friend. So I plan to do just that because I have a full load of tasks already.

To get back to the review, Fitra’s first issue is divided in five chapters. Chapter 1 deals with ‘Where to Start’. Chapter 2 with ‘The Fundamentals’, Chapter 3 talks about ‘Socializing, Support and Self Care’, and Chapter 4 is ‘Further Outside The Box’. Finally, Chapter 5 is about ‘Resources We Love’. Each section is exactly what it sells. It’s on point.

Now, preparation is the key and this issue is very helpful and resourceful because I tell you homeschooling information can be draining and overwhelming! While I have to get the man of the house to agree to homeschool when the kiddo reaches 7 years old, the testaments of Karima Heraoua titled ‘How I Got My Husband To Homeschool’ in particular gives me hope. We have plenty of time to see eye-to-eye on this issue insha’Allah. The kiddo is such a social butterfly and socialization is the main concern. And contributor Jamila Alqarnain addresses this issue and ways to counteract it. Besides, I try my best to make sure the kiddo doesn’t become sheltered.

Klaudia Khan and Saira Siddiqui’s point of views were also very valuable as I felt like they were talking to me in ‘Learning to speak their language‘ and ‘Understanding Child’s Play’ respectively.

Now, I need to get my copy of Miraj Audio because I use an eclectic source with morals from traditional story books which is fine but I want religious tones instilled in my child as well as we ride this homeschool journey we started in November 2015. I’ve always wondered if there was such a thing like Miraj Audio or if it was something I needed to design for the needs of my child. And there is. Alhamdullilah for the help of all these homeschoolers trying to make it easy for us.Jazakh’Allah khair to y’all!

My rating: 5/5

 

The Ducktrinors: Reading the Past from the Future (A Review By Tohib Adejumo)

Front cover the DucksReviews are works of literature that critics use to tell people about books. They give the summary of the book, praise some aspects of it – if they like it, or criticize both the writing and the writer to the tee should they find it unlikeable, and then give their overall take on the work. Well, in the next two to four paragraphs, I will be doing a literary exercise akin to a review on Papatia Feauxzar’s The Ducktrinors, but without all the formalities.

Let’s start.

See, I like the book. The characters are so real even though the book is a sci-fi. Yes, you heard it right. A Muslim fiction not talking about marriage and divorce, but telling of a future, which may not be as far from us as we might like to think. The book tells of a future, a time of anarchy, of oppression, of immorality, of a point where people of faith are pushed to the fringes – no scratch that –a time when they are pushed away from identifying with their faiths. But, in this time, there are few people willing and itching to restore sanity back to the world, and that’s where Hanifa, Our Heroine, comes in.

Oh yes, I love that Hanifa girl. Feauxzar sure knows how to make out a perfect character through making her full of zeal, brain, wisdom, and imperfections. The girl is on a mission, but the mission doesn’t turn her into an angel. Although Hanifa is living in the days of utter moral decadence and she’s devoting all of herself to battle the incubators of these wayward lifestyle, the Seculars, she’s still a young woman with fantasies, crushes, and… well, go read yourself!

Okay, these are the three things I like most about the book:

·         The characters: They’re not extra-ordinary Muslims without pitfalls. Rather, they’re Muslims struggling like every other Muslim. And on top of that, they’re on a mission. Once again, Hanifa, you will fall in love with her. And you’re sure to like Dawud, the young spy and master of technology, too.

·         The Subtle Mirror: The book is set in the future with a mirror of nostalgia. This shows the brilliance of Feauxzar. She makes the book inform us in subtle ways how problems such us sectarianism and group mentalities can be handled through a sneak into the future.

·         The Déjà vu:  Yes, you can read the battle of Badr from the story. When you see the characters in action, you’re quickly thrown back in time, and you experience a double connection – reading the past from the future.

The Ducktrinorsis the first of its kind in the realm of Muslim fiction, and it is a powerful, poignant, and compelling one. Feauxzar has given us a wonderful, insightful, and interesting work of fiction to enjoy and give to our young ones. They – young ones – will be able to get a kick out of the sci-fi of the fiction and lessons out of the signs of the Last Day embedded in it. And oh, lest I forget: you can remove a romance writer from romance fiction, but you cannot remove romance fiction from her, so while the fate of the thenummah may be resting on the shoulders of  Hanifa Ducktrinor, there may still be time for, well, a tiny bit of romance…

 

~Tohib Adejumo is a Nigerian blogger and the author of Love in Ramadan. He spent most of his childhood and adolescent years inIbadan, Nigeria where he attended Ad-Din International School. He graduated from Government College, Ibadan in 2009 and he holds a degree in Liberal Arts from Borough of Manhattan Community College. He is currently a baccalaureate scholar at Hunter College of the City University of New York where he focuses on Socio-Cultural Psychology and African History and Politics. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.~