Homeschooling Tips for Toddlers

Assalamu aleikum!

1441 ah homeschooling times

When you have little people around you, they mess with your stationary. All my markers are dried up or empty because the toddler prefers them to his own crayons. Now, I’m stuck with using his crayons for my own notes….smdh!

Anyway, the above list is a pre-k milestone check-list I found around to check if your kiddo is reasonably progressing before trying to enroll them. That said, I have found out that from doctors to everybody else with an opinion about raising children, there is a great willingness to want to rush children into reaching certain milestones.

Alhamdullilah, we have checked all these milestones naturally without pressure. I have learned that children do things on their own time. You have to pray on it, leave it to Allah and finally show them regularly until one day, it clicks and they become independent with the task you want them to master.

 

Thanks for reading,

~ A Ducktrinor Mom ~

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Ayesha Dean and The Seville Secret’s Online Book Launch!

ayesha graphic for fofkys book launch 4 6 19

Interviewer: Papatia Feauxzar

Interviewee: Melati Lum

The Seville Secret — An Interview with the Author

Ayesha Dean is back with another mystery to resolve in The Seville Secret and our bookstore is excited to get an interview with the author.

Q1- Did you have to go on a literary pilgrimage for this second tome?

A1- Yes! Just like I drew on my visit to Istanbul with The Istanbul Intrigue, I did the same with some scenes in The Seville Secret, although I went there many years ago. The first time I visited Seville and Cordoba, I loved Andalusia so much that I found myself back there again a few years later, but I added Granada, Madrid, and Barcelona to our itinerary as well as returning to Seville and Cordoba. Making those trips and seeing so many sights of historical significance to Muslim rule in Andalusia touched me deeply. It felt amazing to walk the halls and passages of our ancient brethren and to imagine what life would have been like in the ‘Golden Age’ of Islam when the pursuit of knowledge in the arts, philosophy, spirituality, medicine, architecture, music, astrology, and beyond was celebrated and encouraged. It was also an excellent reminder of the temporariness of worldly power and how things can change very quickly in a relatively short space of time.

Q2- I loved the story as it shares a lost Islamic history in a non-preachy way. Additionally, I felt like the story had a very platonic romantic vibe; something I appreciated and it’s something that’s rarely done in YA these days. Everybody is dating in almost all YA books. Was the vibe I felt in Ayesha Dean II intentional for the young adult crowd?

A2- Yes, with respect to the innocent romance. Even though Ayesha Dean and her friends are older teens, I’m conscious of the book being directed at middle-graders, so I didn’t want the love aspect to play too much of a role. ‘Love’ as a pre-teen can be a new and exciting concept, but I think the majority of parents who buy books for their children agree that any ‘love scenes’ should be PG-rated for a children’s book.

Definitely!

Q3- How do you define success in the writing industry?

A3- Success means so many different things to different people. Even within myself, I have different ‘levels’ of success for different aspects of my writing. The writing industry is so wide that it would be difficult to provide an unqualified answer (that’s probably the lawyer in me speaking). I feel like I have achieved some success in writing and publishing a book series that has made a lot of young people happy to see that someone they can relate to is represented in a story book. I’ve written stories that I would have loved reading as a Muslim child growing up as a minority. The positive feedback I’ve received from teachers, parents and children has been an absolute pleasure to behold. But does that mean I think I’ve written a literary masterpiece? No way! In the writing aspect I know I have much to learn. I feel like my writing has improved with the second book, and I fully intend to keep improving as I go along.

Q4- How do you deal with good and bad reviews?

A4- Good reviews are always a pleasure to read! Bad reviews are infinitely less pleasurable. Once I get over the initial hurt of a bad review, I try to approach it with an open mind. I do my best to take constructive criticism on board. But if the criticism isn’t constructive, I try my best to put it out of my mind. I know different things appeal to different people. You can’t always please everyone in life!

Q5- What do you want your readers to take away from this book?

A5- As our world becomes more globalized, and people of all cultures are becoming more integrated in society, I think it’s crucial that more diversity is represented in the books we read. It’s important for Muslims to also be represented among the thousands of heroines or heroes available in children’s literature. I hope that Ayesha Dean can teach children a little bit about Muslims and Islam, and from the resulting familiarity and empathy, both Muslim and non-Muslim kids can benefit by learning more about the world around them.

Melati, thank you for being with us.

Readers, please check out the review of Ayesha Dean – The Seville Secret below.

 

Ayesha Dean — The Seville Secret is the next tome in the cozy mystery series of Australian author Melati Lum.

Summary

Ayesha, Sara and Jess are back in an exciting new adventure, and this time they’re off to Spain! When a fellow passenger’s beloved grandpa strangely disappears, Ayesha and her friends gladly join in the search for the missing person. But as Ayesha delves further into the mystery, the more sinister the stakes become! Ayesha finds a link between the missing person and a 16th century diary that contains clues to an ancient mystery. However, each step closer to discovery seems to pose greater chances of peril. Can Ayesha uncover the truth without putting herself and her friends in mortal danger?

Like Ayesha Dean – The Istanbul Intrigue , book two is also a pleasantly fast read. Ayesha and her friends Sara and Jessica befriend a young man whose grandpa is in trouble. Once in Spain, the girls lend the young man some help to resolve the mystery surrounding his family. This leads them to admire and discover the landmarks in the cities they sight-see, witness the culture and most importantly for me, savor the local food! I happily made Churros while reading this book, and you won’t regret doing the same as it was a good reading companion.

In Ayesha Dean — The Seville Secret, Ayesha upgrades her sleuthing skills. We also find out that Dean can be an Imam and an Accountant with a penchant for the right kind of asceticism. Furthermore, she is a good ambassador of Islam. This is demonstrated by her nice manners such as her willingness to help anyone who asks to pitch in. Dean’s subtle devotion to her faith is a great plus. Thus, her non-Muslim uncle and friends Sara and Jessica have no issue with Islam.

Now, because Ayesha is still young, her uncle doesn’t completely appreciate the fact that she puts the lot of them in danger, and we can understand his concerns. She is dealing once again with unsavory gangsters. Ayesha reassures him to be more careful and takes the necessary precautions to avoid causing harm to herself and her friends.

From devouring delicious Spanish food, uncovering sad and loving family histories and ancestries, evading and exposing dangerous treasure seekers to making appropriate and exciting friendships, this is the book you want your teenager to read in an overly materialistic society.

You can find out about Melati Lum on her website www.melatilum.com.au.

You can follow her on social by clicking on the following:

https://www.facebook.com/melatilum.author/

https://www.instagram.com/melati.lum/

https://twitter.com/melatilum

To end, I highly recommend Ayesha Dean — The Seville Secret to the teen in you and around you who fancy cool and exciting Middle Grade and YA books.

Our Rating: 4.5/5

Original Source: Fofky’s Blog

Ready for Ramadan 2019 : A Countdown and Review of Some Ramadan Books – III

Assalamu aleikum!

Check out three more books for #readyforramadan2019 below please.

 

In Ramadan Launch Poster

 

1. In Ramadan by Mariam Popal Hama

In Ramadan Front Cover

Summary: Contemplate the experiences and lessons in Ramadan through our animal friends. With 30 different aspects of Ramadan explored. Including the Arabic word for each.

Author & Illustrator: Mariam Popal Hama

Publisher: Prolance

Review: In Ramadan is a very artsy children’s book that will help children reflect on thirty basic elements of the nine month of the hijri calendar. Children will learn to link the holy month to the world around—animals and nature— them. The book also uses faceless animals and numbers to achieve this purpose. Finally,  In Ramadan will also increase the vocabulary of children and help them focus more on the light and souls of elements around of them.

sneak peak in ramadan

Thanks to Prolance for the free copy.

Rating: 4.5/5

Courtesy of the Dallas Public Library…

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2. The Jinni on the Roof by Natasha Rafi

the jinni on the rooftop

Summary: Eight-year-old Raza is too young to fast, but he longs for the delicious parathas the grown-ups eat before dawn. The aroma of the flaky, golden bread tempts him. He cannot wait for the children’s breakfast, but he’ll get into trouble if anyone finds him up this early. Lying in bed, Raza hatches a plan. Will he get away with it? This is a delightful tale about a mischievous boy who learns the true meaning of Ramadan – patience and empathy.

Author: Natasha Rafi

Publisher: Pamir LLC

Review: The Jinni on the Roof is an hilarious story that portrays the level of genius of Raza, and his willingness to help his family during Ramadan. I definitely recommend it.

Rating: 4.5/5

3. Night of the Moon by Hena Khan

night of the moon

Summary: …this sweet tale follows Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, as she celebrates the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, “The Night of the Moon” (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illustrations that evoke Islamic art, this beautiful story offers a peek into modern Muslim culture—and into the ancient roots of its most cherished traditions.

Author: Hena Khan

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review: The illustrations are artsy and the story is evocative. Night of the Moon portrays the love relationship between a mother and her daughter during Ramadan. The reader will also learn to marvel at the beauties of the Creation.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

Thank you for reading,

~ A Ducktrinor Mom ~

Ready for Ramadan 2019 : A Countdown and Review of Some Ramadan Books – II

Assalamu aleikum!

ramadan moon lailahs lunch box

Welcome to another #readyforramadan2019 edition. Today, we have two books for you. Check them out!

Ramadan Moon

Summary: Ramadan, the month of fasting, doesn’t begin all at once. It begins with a whisper And a prayer And a wish. Muslims all over the world celebrate Ramadan and the joyful days of Eid-ul-Fitr at the end of the month of fasting as the most special time of year. This lyrical and inspiring picture book captures the wonder and joy of this great annual event, from the perspective of a child. Accompanied by Iranian inspired illustrations, the story follows the waxing of the moon from the first new crescent to full moon and waning until Eid is heralded by the first sighting of the second new moon. Written and illustrated by Muslims, this is a book for all children who celebrate Ramadan and those in the wider communities who want to understand why this is such a special experience for Muslims.

Author: Na’ima B. Robert

Publisher: Lincoln Children’s Books

Review: Ramadan Moon is beautifully illustrated. The quality of the book is also exceptional. It portrays Ramadan well for a Muslim family and depicts lots of love and gratitude all around. Alhamdullilah.

Rating: 5/5

lailas lunchbox

Summary: Lailah is in a new school in a new country, thousands of miles from her old home, and missing her old friends. When Ramadan begins, she is excited that she is finally old enough to participate in the fasting but worried that her classmates won’t understand why she doesn’t join them in the lunchroom. Lailah solves her problem with help from the school librarian and her teacher and in doing so learns that she can make new friends who respect her beliefs.

Author: Reem Faruqi

Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers

Review: Lailah’s Lunchbox explores the challenge of feeling like an outsider with wit. Lailah is lovable and finds comfort in writing to express herself. Today, many people are more aware of other people’s faiths. However, the book is still relevant because there will always be that one person who has no idea what Ramadan is. So this book can help explain. Alhamdullilah.

Rating: 5/5

 

Thank you for reading,

~ A Ducktrinor Mom ~

Two Cute Books by Prolance You Need To Have!

Assalamu aleikum!

I have had the chance to read two children’s books recently published by Muslim Book Publisher Prolance, and I’m happy to share my honest thoughts with you. So here we go.

1. Friends of a Different Kind by Nayera Salam

Friends Launch Poster

Age Range: 3+

Author: Nayera Salam

Illustrator: Jenny Reynish

Publisher: Prolance

Summary: Chocolate Chum is the luckiest dog in the neighborhood! He not only has many doggy friends but he has many pals of a different kind. Frogs, gnomes, cats and more. Meet them all in this story that teaches kids about inclusivity and diversity. From beginning to end, children and adults will be intrigued by the book’s message, the enchanting creatures, and the vivid imagery. Plus fun activities! Visit http://www.kidsbooksbynayera.com. Read-aloud version available.

Thoughts: I really loved Friends of a Different Kind; from the painting style to the rhymes, it was simply a delight to read. This book will teach children to embrace those who are different from them. The book effortlessly achieves this purpose by showing the reader that the characters are animals and/or interesting creatures which have distinctive features.

If we don’t teach children how things around us are different and that’s the beauty of things, we do them a great disservice. The danger of thinking that a specific kind of anything is the standard needs to be resisted. Well done.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Paradise is oh So Nice by Halimah Bashir

Paradise Launch Poster

 

Age Range: 3+

Author: Halimah Bashir

Illustrator: Laila Ramadhani Ritonga

Publisher: Prolance

Summary: Ever wonder what Paradise looks like in the eyes of a child? Giant milkshakes, chocolate castles and ice cream mountains are some of the things Manu and Aya can’t wait to experience. Come along on this adventurous journey where brother and sister’s imagination comes to life and whatever they wish for or desire will come true!

Thoughts: Paradise is oh So Nice is a beautifully illustrated book with vivid colors. The book has two versions; a regular one where Allah is mentioned as “God” and an Islamic version where Allah is mentioned as ” الله .”

This is a nice option in case you want to gift the book as a dawah effort. I also loved this book because it aims at raising young mumeens in a fun context and stretches their imagination.

What else can a Muslim mom like me who wants to raise a young Believer ask for? Hehe…

Rating: 5/5

Check out a sneak peek into the book below:

sneak peek paradise

I received free e-Versions in return for my honest thoughts.

Thank you for reading,

~A Ducktrinor Mom~

Ready for Ramadan 2019 : A Countdown and Review of Some Ramadan Books – I

ramadan 1440 or 2019

Besides my personal stack of Ramadan books for children, I was surprised to find over twenty books dealing with Ramadan at my local library. They were written by Muslims and non-Muslims. While I was happy about the mix of the sources, I was also sad by the lack of the mention of the honorific title ﷺ of the Beloved, the misrepresentation and false facts that seeped and got weaved in some of them. As Muslim parents, we have to make sure that we are aware of what is and what is not Ramadan and Islam. Below is part of my current stack. Alhamdullilah for a library.

ramadan books at fofkys

In this post, I will review some books and in the spirit of our countdown to the Sultan of the Months, I will review the others insha’Allah.

1. Ramadan (Celebrate the World) by Hannah Eliot

celebrate the world ramadan

Summary: In the ninth month of the year, when the first crescent moon rises in the sky, it’s time to celebrate Ramadan! In this lovely board book with illustrations from Rashin Kheiriyeh, readers learn that Ramadan is a time to reflect on ourselves, to be thankful, and a time to help others.

What I liked: The book is suitable for a toddler like mine. He was naturally drown to it. The illustrations are bright and colorful. The texts are short and great for his attention span. Finally, the chickens made him giggle alhamdullilah.

What I didn’t like: The characters closed their eyes during prayers. This is a practice that other people of the book did and do. Muslims were advised not to do this. I’m not sure if it was a challenge to draw characters with eyes cast down instead of completely shut. Allahu alim.

Rating: 4/5

2. Max celebrates Ramadan by Adria F. Worsham

max celebrates ramadan

Summary: Omar invites Max to his house for the end of Ramadan. Family, food, and fun are all part of the special day.

What I liked: The book reinforces the notion of giving, and the holy month is a lot about being charitable. It’s also an easy read to tackle with a toddler.

What I found strange: Moon and stars at the window during the Eid al-Fitr feast. Most Muslim families would agree that Believers rarely have a Ramadan dinner. Everybody is already full by then. The majority of the time, we are eager to eat at mid-day after thirty days of not doing so. I could be wrong.

Rating: 4/5

3. Ramadan by Sheila Anderson

ramadan sheila anderson

Summary: Introduces Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and prayer, and describes its history and the traditions and celebrations held for the holiday around the world.

What I liked: The book tries to answer basic questions about Ramadan succinctly. So, if you feel your child asks a lot of questions about Ramadan, this book can make your life easier.

What could have been worded better: “Muhammad is the founder of Islam. Muslims believe God told Muhammad how people should live their lives.” Everything about these two sentences is problematic to me. They were more Prophets sent with the message of Islam (Peace and Submission to The One True God) before Rasool sallallahu aleihi wassalam; the final and last Messenger. In addition, Islam is a way of life. It could have been worded this way in the second sentence.

Rating: 3/5

4. My First Ramadan by Karen Katz

my first ramadan

Summary: It’s time for Ramadan to begin. Follow along with one young boy as he observes the Muslim holy month with his family. This year, the narrator is finally old enough to fast, and readers of all ages will be interested as he shares his experiences of this special holiday in Islam.

What I liked: The book does a great job at showing the diversity of the adherents of Islam and encourages children to fast.

What I didn’t like: The characters also closed their eyes during prayers here too. It also felt like the protagonist’s family was missing their praying rugs, wore their shoes to pray and the little girl had no scarf on her head in the first pages of the book. She seemed old enough to don one in salaat.

Rating: 4/5

5. Rashad’s Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr by Lisa Bullard

rashads ramadan

Summary: For Muslims, Ramadan is a time for fasting, prayer, and thinking of others. Rashad tries to be good all month. When it’s time for Eid al-Fitr, he feasts and plays! Find out how people celebrate this special time of year.

Favorite part: “I’ve decided I’m going to watch the moon all year. I know it will grow bigger and smaller many times.” — Rashad

Rating: 4/5

If these books piqued your interest, add them to your collection of children books today by clicking on the hyperlinks. For more Ramadan reads, check here.

See you on March 4th and April 4th for more reviews of more books about Ramadan insha’Allah!

 

Thank you for reading,

~A Ducktrinor Mom~

“Mommy, Who Is Allah? Al-Khaliq” Has Been Translated!

Between Sisters, SVP!

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Alhamdulillah, “Mommy, Who Is Allah?” is now, translated into Arabic, Urdu, Spanish, German, French and Turkish. Subhanah Allah, I’m so excited that children around the world will begin learning about Allah in a simple manner. I hope they will find it a delightful experience.”— Susan Zainab Jones

Find out more about the author at this link : https://www.amazon.com/Susan-Zainab-Jones/e/B074CRVTRG or on her blog here.

#alhamdullilah #masha’Allah

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Top 6 Most Influential Muslim Youth You Should Know About

Top 6 influential Muslim Youth 

In the US, about 99% of Muslim children attend public schools. However, a great majority of them face identity issues, disconnection from their faith and an erasure of influential Muslim role models to look up to in order to feel normal and accepted in the diversely apparent Western environment.

As a result, Muslims have started to reclaim and assert their narratives. Generation M’s accomplishments and contributions are booming and this helps curate our era’s Islamic history better via art, literature, fashion, food and science to name a few.

Having said that, there are new contributors to this history: the Muslim youth. Indeed, many landslide and prideful moments for the ummah are often achieved by these young entrepreneurs.

Therefore, check out six post-millenniums who are making waves in and outside the ummah by writing history.

1- Aminah Jasmine Rahman

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Today, at 14-years-old, Rahman is the author of two poetry collections—Poems by Aminah and Soul Change— and a multi-award winner. She is so young and so wise at the same time. Read her poem Glittering Space and perhaps you will come to the same conclusion.

Aminah Rahman is also the winner of the 2015 Young Muslim Writers Awards. This Muslim Youth is inspirational as it gets for folks her age and beyond. She lives in the UK.

Check out her books at major online book distributors.

2- Anwar Diggins

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Recipient of the 2018 NAACP’s Rising Star Award, Diggins is an American author of the children’s book titled Game Over : Life Outside of Video Games.

With his book, he aims at raising awareness on fun activities hardcore gamers can do to avoid the depression and loneliness that come with playing video games non-stop based on his own experience. An already aspiring business savvy individual, Anwar Diggins is a philanthropist dedicated to the cure of cancer.

Check him out on Instagram @enterprisesbyAnwar.

3- Amaya Diggins

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Sister to the previous cited Top Influential Muslim Youth, Amaya Diggins founded Hijabi Fits.

The 11-year-old became an inspirational entrepreneur and role model when she decided to make the change she wanted to see; designing fitting, stylish and attractive hijabs for her age group. Her contribution to history is unprecedented. Most hijab designers catered to an older crowd, and when their hijabs catered to younger girls, they didn’t fit right. Kuddos to Amaya Diggins for her brilliance.

4- Stephanie Kurlow

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Kurlow is an Australian-Russian convert to Islam. The 15-year-old Muslim Ballerina showed the naysayers that religion is not a barrier to achieve one’s dreams. Anything can be done and one just needs to believe in one’s potential.

As the first Muslimah Ballerina, Kurlow did just that and modestly. She is an inspiration to Muslims of all ages everywhere; especially in Australia, her hometown.

5- Juwayriyah Ayed

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Co-author of the children’s book Hind’s Hands and one of the curator of the first Muslim Fiction app by American Umm Juwayriyah, her mother, Juwayriyah’s book helps raise awareness on autism; especially in Muslim settings. These contributions are much needed and pave the way for upcoming Muslim works.

6- Mena and Zena Nasiri

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The Nasiri Sisters founded Girls of the Crescent; a NFP organization dedicated to collect books with diverse characters and most importantly Muslim ones to help the Muslim youth relate better to their identity.

The books donated to them are donated in turn to mainstream libraries. With their efforts, they hope that no Muslim Youth struggle to see themselves represented in books written in the West. The 14-year-old Mena and her 15-year-old sister Zena live in Michigan, USA.

Let us introduce these children to our children so that they can be inspired and also make the change they want to see.

 

Original article at AboutIslam here.

Muslim Mums in Business – Djarabi Kitabs Publishing and Fofky’s

My Muslim Mums in Business series focus’s on inspirational Muslim women, who are balancing the art of motherhood along with running businesses.

 

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Please introduce yourself and your business.

I go under the pen name of Papatia Feauxzar; a name that embodies my Ivorian and Turkish heritage. I’m now a naturalized American citizen alhamdullilahDjarabi Kitabs Publishing and Fofky’s are my home businesses. They both compliment each other; one being a publishing house and the other being a bookstore alhamdullilah. The goal is help make quality Muslim contributions seen and curate our Islamic History and contribution to the world.

 

What inspired you to start working from home? Did anyone in particular inspire you?

Many things did. Islamophobia was one aspect of it and I wanted to homeschool my son. I also wanted to witness all his firsts. Nobody in particular inspired me; Allah did. I decided to make the change I wanted to see when I saw many Muslim writers complain about the erasure and lack of support they faced. Finally, I have always wanted to be a writer and a female scholar. So, I’m doing my part to see these dreams to come life insha’Allah.

 

Is your family supportive of you being a working mother?

Yes, they are now. It was with a lot of conflict and keeping my grounds though. Alhamdullilah ala kulli haal.

 

What are the main challenges you face as a mum and an entrepreneur?

My main challenge is to force myself to enjoy my personal time and my family. One should always cherish one’s family first and before everything. Tomorrow is not guaranteed, and I’m glad I didn’t learn that the hard way or lived to regret not giving them the attention they deserve. Keeping my stress levels low too are also a challenge but with dua, I manage to obtain sakinah of mind, body, and soul through constant dhikr and listening to the Quran.

 

Describe a typical working day. Are there specific times in the day that you work on your business? You have a number of businesses/projects running together. Does it all sometimes become a bit overwhelming trying to manage them all.

A typical day starts after tahajud. Often times, it’s hard for me to sleep until after fajr prayer when I pray it. But on days I don’t pray tahajud, the day starts after fajr. I look at my list of things to do and start planning mentally. I get my son and my husband out of the way by attending to their needs. Then, I start cooking, cleaning, checking emails while listening to the Quran. By noon, I’m usually done with my chores and to-do list of things set for the day. I do all this while interacting with my son and checking on him periodically as he plays or teach him a couple things here and there. I also teach him new words, manners, I hug him, I kiss him or I scold him nicely if he is being naughty. Then, we pray and get ready to go outside so he can get another kind of interaction; children’s play. I do dhikr while he plays with other children. I’m more productive with my remembrance of Allah when he plays. I understood that children’s play actually is a blessing on Moms to help them relax. So, I take fully advantage of my child’s plays. We both benefit from this activity alhamdullilah. While we are out, I also run errands, mail packages, etc. When we return, he eats and naps, and I pray. I get dinner ready and when the hubby gets home, I get to perform some self-care and/or complete more things on my to-do list alhamdullilah. All this seems overwhelming at times but I calm down and do one thing at a time while supplicating and before I know it, I have had a productive day alhamdullilah.

 

What are the pros and cons about being a working mum from home?

Cons: It’s more than a full-time job. It can be stressful just thinking about it.

Pros: It’s rewarding and you realize that there is ease with hardship. I witness so much by raising my son myself. I have become a little more grateful for any small to big blessings bestowed upon me and us. I have learned not to take anything for granted.

 

On your toughest days, what helps keep you motivated?

Filling my book of deeds with good deeds always keeps me motivated. I try not to loose sight of Jannah al-Firdaus. I’m not saying all this to come off holier than anyone or calmer than anyone. I say this because it has taken me a lot of practice and a lot of patience to reach this level of self-motivation. Having said that, bad moments in a day happen, and I try not to capitalize on them. I let them go and refocus on positivity alhamdullilah.

 

Where would you like to see your business in the future?

I would like it to be seen as an accredited House of Wisdom type of historic contribution insha’Allah.

 

What advice would you give to mums considering taking the step of being a working mum? 

Children are the joy in the journey. Children are the comfort to the stress you will face as a working mom. Embrace the challenge. Working moms can do it and Allah didn’t burden us. He knew we can handle the load with true dedication to a well-balanced lifestyle. Let’s be Khadijah al-Kubra radiallahu anhu; business-savvy woman in a tough and restricting society, modest, knowledgeable, respected, mother of believers, garment to a spouse, and all the great things she is known to have done or been insha’Allah. Age was just a number.

 

JazakAllah Khair to sister Papatia for taking the time out of her busy schedule to answer my questions! You can connect with her further at: Djarabi Kitabs Publishing and Fofky’s.

Papatia fofky

If you are a Muslim mum with a business and would like to feature then drop me a message in sha Allah.

Original article.